Something Swedish


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Studying Swedish in Sweden – Comparing EVERYTHING about SFI, SAS Grund and SAS Gymnasiet

SFI vs. SAS Grund vs.  SAS Gymnasiet

This comparison chart is based off of my personal experiences studying in Halmstad 2012 – 2014 and researching information online. Things might vary by town or teacher but most things are regulated by skolverket. If anything has been updated or changed, or if you have anything to add or ask, let me know!

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Today is two years since starting Something Swedish, and in two months it will mark two years since I started going to school to learn Swedish.  Since then, I’ve tried to keep my progress in school up to date, without overloading the blog. Catch up here:

Applied to SFI Feb 7, 2012
Started SFI  March 27, 2012
First SFI National test  Sept 20, 2012
(Finished SFI Dec 15, 2012)
Started ground level SAS/Comparing SFI and SAS  Jan 16, 2013
Finished SAS (18 weeks early) June 27, 2013

Being back in High School:

I somehow failed to mention that I started taking high school (gymnasiet)  level Swedish in August. So, here’s an update and an in depth comparison post that I hope helps people just starting out!

Three weeks ago the first level (1/3) of SAS gymnasiet ended. I had mixed emotions about the class, and put in a mixed amount of effort. This was partly because of being tired of studying, being bored with the difficulty level, being busy working, and focusing on a more difficult class (civics/political science) I was taking at the same time. I got an overall grade of B in the class, as well as on the national exam (oral presentation = A, reading comprehension =A, essay = C)

I was excited to start SAS1 because I read that it would be challenging and center around literature, which I love. Finally I would be learning Swedish on a level where other Swedes study! I was a bit disappointed to find out that this first class is a mix between a repetition of SAS Grund and preparation for SAS2. I understand it’s purpose, but I was bored – and unlike all of the other classes I’ve taken, you don’t have the option to go through the material quicker: 20 weeks means 20 weeks. If I had known that, I would have taken a test to be places in SAS2. Thankfully I had a teacher I like and find easy to learn from and understand (and have had before) and was in a class with some people I knew from SAS. Even if it was a bit slower than I would have liked, it fit my schedule perfectly and still challenged me from time to time.

I’ll be updating the chart and writing more in depth about the national exam once I complete the whole course and have more insight – which feels like forever away.


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Success: Swedish as a Second Language (SAS)

It’s official! After 22 weeks in Swedish as a Second Language and Civics (Svenska som Andra Språk och Samhällskunskap), I’ve made it! – 18 weeks early and with the highest grade for the course (A)!

In January I wrote a short comparison of SAS and SFI (Here) and six months later here I am telling you about the end!

One thing that I learned is that there are two options for S.A.S: Komvux and Learnia, which are very different. My experience is based off of Kumvux, which I found to be much more rewarding. Learnia goes by much quicker (20 weeks) with less/no assignments, no tests, and hardly any teacher interaction.

S.A.S. typically takes 40 weeks, that’s ten weeks for every course (E, F, G, H which each include two chapters) but anyone can go faster or slower depending on how much work they do. Having class 12 hours a week and studying an additional 15 hours a week let me go through it quickly (hence my infrequent blog updates lately).  There is a test at the end of each chapter, and a bunch of assignments in between ranging from simple questions to book reports and essays.

Even though there are less formal lessons from the teachers when compared to SFI, and more “egen arbete” (Own work) I felt I learned a lot because the teachers instead give more one on one time to review your tests and anything you write, focusing on your specific problems. My work had drastically improved by the time I got to the last course, even being excused from a whole chapter because the teacher thought my level was beyond it at 20 weeks into the program, which gave me more time to focus on my final assignment.

My last few assignments in the course included a seven minute speech and a power point presentation in Swedish on a topic of our own choosing without the use of notes (I spoke about the benefits of running), an in depth short story analysis, a research paper from a limited choice of topics (I wrote nine pages on Norse Mythology/Religion), and a final exam.

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From my final research paper: “You have written a work that meets all the requirements on a ground level and a little extra. You have chosen relative facts, detailed facts, done comparisons, checked sources and structured the work in an easy to understand way. The reading was interesting! The language is fantastically good with a rich vocabulary and very good grammatical structure… simply a brilliantly good work that gets the highest grade: A. Good job!”

Now I get to enjoy my vacation, until I start my next step in August: SWEDISH HIGH SCHOOL. (Well, high school level work, anyway)

Upcoming updates:

Something Swedish in NYC
Video: Studenten (Swedish graduation)
Video: National Dag (Sweden’s National Day)
Video: Midsummer (Sweden’s most beloved holiday)


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S.F.I _ v s _ S.A.S

I started my next step towards Swedish fluency this week – Svenska som Andra Språk, S.A.S. (Swedish as a Second Language)

All throughout my S.F.I (Svenska for Invandare/ Swedish for Immigrants) classes I’ve heard about this awesome next level of learning and how much better and more helpful it is.

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The difference between the two schools is bigger than I expected, but I wouldn’t say one is better than the other – just different approaches for different levels.

S.A.S is sort of an extension of S.F.I,  only because you must finish S.F.I first and your ability in S.F.I determines your level in S.A.S.  Confused yet?

I knew SAS would be more formal and different from SFI as soon as we had to sign rules and a study contract during the orientation:

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SFI ranges from levels A – D, and SAS has levels E – H.

SFI covers the basics of the language so that you can function at an Elementary level, while SAS is considered Middle School level.

At orientation most people (about 25) went to the “E” level and a few of us (5) skipped ahead to “F” or “G” because of recommendations from our SFI teachers – I started in “F” – which means I am skipping 10 weeks of SAS!  The “normal” pace means that class takes 10 weeks, but you can take your time or work faster, since you have the whole schedule of assignments. If you work at the “average” pace, SAS takes a total of 40 weeks, I should be done in 30, but I’m aiming for sooner!

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The biggest difference in SAS is the amount of structure – every level focuses on specific chapters of the same book, has a weekly and daily plan, with pages of assignments and  goals.

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This type of structure is not found in SFI because so many people are at so many different levels and learn at such different speeds. Until you get the basics of the language, it’s hard to work on your own, which is 90% of SAS.

My schedule went from having 4 hour long classes to 2 hour classes, which consist of a lot of “egen arbete tid” – “own work time.” It’s easy to stay on track and know what you are supposed to be doing by following the study plan, where as in SFI it was common to switch between topics, assignments, and difficulty levels from day to day in an effort to include everyone and give a wide base knowledge of the language.

SAS is more specific and more like an actual class. Instead of talking about vocabulary and spending 10 minutes explaining one word for one or two students, we read on our own and discuss “why?” and “what do you think?” together.

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We are responsible for making our own study time plan, keeping track of books we read, listing words and definitions, using given verbs in sentences, and other things that are updated daily, along side with the homework assignments. It’s my second day of SAS and I’ve already finished 4 assignments and 7 out of the 59 check points there are required to complete level F. It feels good to have an organized work plan to follow.

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Within the next three weeks we will all be reading the same book, “Marie Curie”  and discussing it on Tuesdays – with a book report at the end. My “F” class is very focused on writing, which might be the teachers method or each level focuses on a different aspect of the language (speech, hearing, reading, writing). I think reading this book will be the hardest part of the class, but I’m pretty excited to start reading something other than children’s books.

Vocabulary

Test – Prov

Grades – Betygen

School – Skolan

Study – Studera

Learn – Lär

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